Dr. Steven Reisman, Director of the New York Cardiac Diagnostic Center, discusses the recent CDC report that approximately one in three American adults have the condition called pre- diabetes. Pre-diabetes is a condition with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Individuals with pre-diabetes have a greater likelihood of developing type II diabetes along with heart disease and stroke.

In a recent report in HealthDay (1/26, Preidt) the CDC reported that approximately 26 million Americans have diabetes and about 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes. This is a significant increase over estimated levels of pre-diabetes in 2008. It is felt that the increasing rates of obesity are related to the rising rates of both diabetes and pre-diabetes. Those who develop diabetes are not able to use the insulin that their body produces properly and therefore the amount of blood sugar increases. High blood sugar can have adverse effects leading to heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve problems, and other vascular diseases.

Anther reason that there appeared to be an increase in the finding of diabetes and pre-diabetes may have to do with a relatively new testing procedure called hemoglobin A1c which measures the level of blood sugar over a period of several months from a simple blood test.

Dr. Steven Reisman, a Manhattan Cardiologist, advises that a simple blood test and consultation can determine whether an individual has either diabetes or pre-diabetes. If one of these conditions is found an aggressive regimen of weight reduction, exercise, and if necessary medication can be prescribed.