Dr. Steven Reisman, a New York City Cardiologist and Director of the New York Cardiac Diagnostic Center announces the acquisition and implementation of a more accurate automatic device for the detection of high blood pressure also known as hypertension.

Hypertension is a major risk factor for people developing cardiovascular disease including heart attack and stroke. The problem with the detection of hypertension is the lack of symptoms at earlier stages. In addition, the difficulty in diagnosis occurs partly because of a variation in blood pressure and a phenomenon known as the “white coat effect” or “white coat hypertension”. The white coat effect is a tendency of some patients to have a higher blood pressure when medical personnel are present versus blood pressure being measured in the individual’s natural environment. White coat effect can lead to misdiagnosis of hypertension and unnecessary treatment.

Since patients may have an elevated blood pressure when being seen for the first time in a physician’s office, multiple visits may be required to make a definitive diagnosis. It has been reported that white coat hypertension may account for 20%-25% of hypertensive patients. Therefore, hypertension may be overdiagnosed. Some studies have reported that 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and self measurement at home are more accurate in diagnosis. One problem with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is that it is not always covered by insurance. Over the last several years a relatively new device called the BpTRU blood pressure device has found acceptance in several medical centers around the country and has recently been shown by the Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine to yield a significant increase in accuracy in the detection of hypertension over standard physician measured blood pressure. BpTRU readings have been shown to correlate with average awake ambulatory blood pressure. This device works by automatically recording blood pressure without any medical personnel in the room. It can record automatic blood pressures every two minutes with a readout of five blood pressures along with an average blood pressure in a single office visit.  This has been shown to be an improved method for the diagnosis of hypertension.

Dr. Reisman, Director of the New York Cardiac Diagnostic Center, states that the New York Cardiac Diagnostic Center has begun using this device to accurately diagnose high blood pressure and is one of the few outpatient offices in Manhattan using it for the accurate diagnosis of hypertension.